Splash – Let the electricity flow

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Electricity Stuff

This article was about electrical conductors and insulators and the guy that who was somehow connected to electricity with experiments.

That ‘guy’ was called Stephen Gray. At the charter house, he built a wooden frame and room the top beam, he hung two silk-rope swings. He also had a Hauksbee machine that generated static electricity. Usually with a large audience, he got one of the orphan boys, that lived there and they lay across on the swings. Stephen would then put some gold leaf in front of the boy, he then would generate electricity and he would charge the boy through a connecting rod. Gold leaf -and sometimes feathers- would fly to his hand. Stephen then found out that electricity could move. From the machine to the boy to his hands but the silk ropes stopped it.That meant that electricity could flow through some things but not others. This led him to divide the world into two different substances, conductors and insulators. Insulators held electrical charge in them so they could not let the electricity move, for example the silk or hair or glass or resin. Conductors let the electricity flow through them for example people and metal. You know those electrical pylons? They work the same principle. The wires are conductors, the glass and ceramic objects between the wire and metal of the pylon are insulators that stop electricity from leaking into the pylon and down into earth. 

Were the pylons materials inspired by Stephen Gray’s work? How long did it take Stephen Gray to have a finished experiment of the electricity? 

I understand how Stephen Gray made his machine and how the pylons work like his machine.

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What are dreams?

This article talked about dreams scientifically and what people thought dreams were.

We dream for around about two hours every night on average. That’s six years of your life. But even with modern science, there’s still a lot we don’t know about how and why dreams happen. Different cultures believed different things, for example; Ancient Egyptians believed dreams were messages from the gods, sent to chosen people when they were sleeping, Ancient Chinese thought dreams were journeys taken by souls, which could leave someone’s body when they were sleeping. Nowadays there are books to decode your dreams but there is no real science in this. Dreaming usually takes place when we’re in the deepest stages of sleep and our brain activity increases. It’s called the REM which stands for Rapid Eye Movement Phase. In this stage, our brain can mimic being awake. When we dream about faces, the facial recognition part of our brain turns on and when we look around in our dreams, our brain acts we are awake and looking around. “Dream Dictionary’s” might tell you your dreams have special meanings but even when that’s a cool idea, it’s not backed up by science. 

Is the same with nightmares? If you dream averagely, for 6 years over your life, is this to a certain age…what if you live longer or shorter?

I understand REM and how it works.

BTN – Ocean Floor Mapping

I wrote a copy and I was messing around with the touchscreen keyboard and the tab deleted. I couldn’t remember everything I wrote so I had to work with what I remembered and add other stuff. It’s not as good as my first one. Just a heads up.

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Ocean Floor Mapping

 

This article was about the missing MH370 and “The Fish” and, of course, ocean floor mapping.

On March 2014 an airplane heading to China from Malaysia went missing just under 30 minutes after take-off. After three years of searching, the case had been officially closed in January. But 4.7 million square kilometres of ocean was mapped in the biggest and most expensive aircraft search in history. It didn’t find the MH370 but it gave scientist’s a chance to map the seafloor. Most of our maps of the sea aren’t very detailed. We actually have more detailed maps for planets like Mars instead of the Ocean. We use satellites to give rough estimates but that isn’t enough to find a lost plane. This is where the “Fish” comes in. The Fish is a machine that sends sound waves to the bottom of the sea. Then a signal comes back. The strength of the signal tells us how deep it is and whether the ground is hard or soft. The Fish has helped map 700 thousand square kilometres of ocean floor. The data could help research in climate change and it can help predict when tsunamis will hit. But the mapped area is only 1% of Indian Ocean. 

Are there different models of The Fish? What are some theories of how the MH370 went missing?

I understand how The Fish can help map the Ocean floor.

 

BTN – Megafauna Fossil Footprints

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Click the link for the video!

This article was about evidence on extinct animals found on Kangaroo Island.

The scientific name of the Tasmanian Tiger is Thylacinus cynocephalus. Apparently it basically means pouched dog with a wolf’s head. It was called that because it looked like a pouched dog with a wolf’s head. The thylacine went extinct almost 100 years ago. Experts say it died out because of hunting, loss of habitat and disease. Over time the Tasmanian Tiger has become sort of an Aussie mystery, the only reason because is that there’ve been thousands of reported sightings out in the wild. But none of those have been proven so it is near impossible it could still be alive.

Are there any other extinct animals on Kangaroo Island? Do people try to find evidence that the Tasmanian Tiger is still alive?

I understand that without rock hard evidence then no one can prove anything extinct is still alive.

BTN- War on Waste School

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War on Waste School

This article was about Adelaide Primary School taking charge about Recycling after watching an inspiring video.

Australia used to be the best country when it came to waste but now we are one of the biggest waste producers with 41 million tonnes of rubbish created every year, which is 41,000,000,000 kilograms. They were asking a cafe to give a discount for people who brought in their own reusable cups instead of asking for a throw away one since it has a little bit of plastic in them. They also bought bags for the school to eliminate plastic. Plastic bags take years to break down but these ones that the school got are better.

Can they do anything else to help recycling and getting rid of plastic? Was the whole class in one this idea or was it just a couple of people?

I understand why they would want to make Australia a better recycler user.

BTN – Weedy Seadragon

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This article was about how weedy sea dragons are becoming less and less easier to spot, and it’s not because of their camouflage.

15 kays from Sydney is where dragons live. Weedy seadragons are native to Australia and can be found in the ocean off the South and East coasts. They’re related to seahorses and they blend in with the kelp around them. Sadly rising sea temperatures are killing the kelp which leaves them without a home. Marine biologists have a plan to work out how many sea dragons are left. Instead of catching and tagging every seadragon they find, they’re asking citizen scientist divers off the coasts of New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania to take photos of the creatures and send them in. The researchers are using a facial recognition software to identify each fish’s unique pattern. Weedy seadragons are classified as ‘near threatened’ but scientists think this research could provide enough information to have them re-listed as ‘endangered’. They say climate change could be a big part of the problem.

What is the difference between seahorses and seadragons? Do they have any protection against predators?

I now understand how much climate change is taking a toll on the world. 

Weedy Seadragons

BTN – Skinny Model Laws

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Skinny Model Laws

This article was about models feeling pressure because they feel like they aren’t normals because sometimes they are retouched with photoshop and feel the need to be unhealthily skinny.

Even though some people are naturally skinny, trying to be skinnier can be lead to major health issues like dangerous eating habits. Experts say these images can have a bad effect, because they can make people think they need to look a certain way. But looking a certain way or being skinny isn’t always healthy, in fact, it isn’t even always realistic, because a lot of this stuff is digitally altered or photoshop. So, from now on, for a model to be eligible for a job there they have to have doctor’s certificate to prove they’re a healthy weight. If a company breaks the rules and hires a model without checking with the models doctor, they could face fines of up to 100 thousand dollars and staff could go into jail for up to six months.

In Australia, do people only hire skinny people? Does Australia have the same rule/law as France?

I know understand why in magazines and ads they are so unrealistic and plastic.

BTN – Fashion Waste

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Fashion Waste

This article was about Australia buying to much cheap quality clothes because of trends which goes into landfill.

Throwing out unwanted clothes is actually a huge impact on the environment. Back in the old days, people only have a couple of outfits and when they fell apart they would recycle them but sewing them up again and again. Australia is the 2nd biggest consumer of fabric per person in the world. Each one of us buys an average of 27 kilos of clothing. Some clothing end up in 2nd hand shops but 85% end up in landfill. Clothing made from polyester can take up to 200 years to break down. Some people say we should think more about what we’re buying and whether it’s been made with good quality or buy fewer clothes of better quality. Others say it’s unlikely we’ll be able to break our “addiction” to the latest trends.

Do people realise how much throwing away clothes actually mean? Are people trying to make it better or just dismissing it?

I now know how clothes and landfill are so important and understand how to help.

BTN – Shark Nets

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Shark nets

This article was about how some surfers got bitten by sharks at different times but at the same place. They are resorting to nets but some of the public don’t like it.

17-year old Cooper was surfing at Ballina last school holidays when he was bitten on the leg by a 3.5 metre shark. Luckily there were no major injuries but a week later, it happened to another surfer at the same beach. Then it happened again near Byron Bay. Luckily, they were all okay. But now locals say it’s time to take action. So how do you protect people from these predators of the deep? Well that’s a question the state’s government’s been trying to answer for a while. They’ve been testing new technology including these special listening stations. They can detect tagged sharks within 500 metres and alert people around.It’s been using drones and little blimps to keep an eye out for sharks. It’s also put out smart drum lines. They’re baited hooks designed to lure and catch sharks, then alert authorities so the animals can be tagged and set free. But, after the latest attacks, the state government says it’s time to try another plan they’ve been working on – shark nets. There are already some along parts of the New South Wales coast. The nets stretch about 200 metres long, drop around 10 to 12 metres down and are placed about 500 metres away from shore. The idea is to stop sharks, and keep people on the other side safe. But that means sharks sometimes get tangled in the nets and die; so do other animals, including whales, dolphins, turtles, rays, some are even threatened species. That’s why some locals are against the idea. Instead they’d prefer more monitoring, and for people to remember the water is a shark’s habitat not ours. One local said: “Would you go to the wilds of Africa and set traps to kill every lion in the area, just so you could walk through the Savannah?” Although shark nets can reduce the risk of an attack, some marine experts say they don’t always work. The water can be too rough for the nets to stay up, or sharks can swim around them. But some locals say shark nets are worth a try if they could save lives this summer. The shark nets are set to rollout by the Christmas holidays and the state government says it’ll keep doing its best to protect people in the water.

I wonder why people think it is okay that we can walk into their home, their habitat and act like its ours? Why would people rather live their summer to the fullest with shark nets then save a bunch of animals (some are endangered)?

Even though I don’t agree with shark nets I can see why they would put them up.

BTN – Coonalpyn Silo Art

This BTN was about a small town between Adelaide and Melbourne but hardly anyone stops by so they asked a Australian artist called Guido to come and do some of his famous giant murals.

Guido decided to feature local kids in his design. He said, “I think children represent an image of the future that I think’s quite positive and playful and that’s also very neutral.” After choosing his models, Guido started work on the silos by first striking up reference points that he compares to his smaller sketches. Then over the next few weeks he uses a forklift and a lot of spray paint to carefully complete the 35-metre-tall paintings. It’s now one of the largest and most complex murals in Australia. The atmosphere was described as “The hype around the town is exciting, everyone’s excited about it even the farmers who probably thought that public art would not make an impact are very impressed.”

Does Guido always gets his art how he wants it or does it sometimes turn out not that great? Is he always happy with his art?

I now realize and understand how much art can really  make an impact on a town or community.