Splash – Let the electricity flow

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Electricity Stuff

This article was about electrical conductors and insulators and the guy that who was somehow connected to electricity with experiments.

That ‘guy’ was called Stephen Gray. At the charter house, he built a wooden frame and room the top beam, he hung two silk-rope swings. He also had a Hauksbee machine that generated static electricity. Usually with a large audience, he got one of the orphan boys, that lived there and they lay across on the swings. Stephen would then put some gold leaf in front of the boy, he then would generate electricity and he would charge the boy through a connecting rod. Gold leaf -and sometimes feathers- would fly to his hand. Stephen then found out that electricity could move. From the machine to the boy to his hands but the silk ropes stopped it.That meant that electricity could flow through some things but not others. This led him to divide the world into two different substances, conductors and insulators. Insulators held electrical charge in them so they could not let the electricity move, for example the silk or hair or glass or resin. Conductors let the electricity flow through them for example people and metal. You know those electrical pylons? They work the same principle. The wires are conductors, the glass and ceramic objects between the wire and metal of the pylon are insulators that stop electricity from leaking into the pylon and down into earth. 

Were the pylons materials inspired by Stephen Gray’s work? How long did it take Stephen Gray to have a finished experiment of the electricity? 

I understand how Stephen Gray made his machine and how the pylons work like his machine.

100WC – Week #48 – so, what lies ahead of

I couldn’t believe I was finally getting married to Camilla. I wrung my hands together. I shouldn’t be nervous, this law change was needed. Cam’s family hadn’t met me yet because they lived overseas and while they did fly over here, they weren’t able to meet me. Hopefully their accepting? I quickly finger combed my hair and gripped my dress as I walked down the aisle. Surprised whispers flooded the room. After the shocked wedding, I gripped Camilla’s hand and whispered, “So, what lies ahead of this?”

She shrugged, “All I know is that I love you, Ruby.”

 

(Not part of 100WC) The Gay Marriage Vote is coming up and I fully support it even if I am too young to vote. Everyone I know is supporting gay marriage and you should to!

100WC – Week #47

Image

“You know what happened on the weekend?” I asked my little brother, Mathy, “Me and Sally…you know that girl with the blondish hair?”

“The one you call you bestie?”

“Yeah, anyway me and Sally saw this huge shadow in the trees at the park and we followed it. It was making these huge noises and then we saw it and it looked like a huge dog but with wings and then it took two steps on the grass and jumped into the sky and flew away!”

Mathy thought about it. “Really?”

“…Nah!” I said.

“I knew it!” he shrieked happily.

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What are dreams?

This article talked about dreams scientifically and what people thought dreams were.

We dream for around about two hours every night on average. That’s six years of your life. But even with modern science, there’s still a lot we don’t know about how and why dreams happen. Different cultures believed different things, for example; Ancient Egyptians believed dreams were messages from the gods, sent to chosen people when they were sleeping, Ancient Chinese thought dreams were journeys taken by souls, which could leave someone’s body when they were sleeping. Nowadays there are books to decode your dreams but there is no real science in this. Dreaming usually takes place when we’re in the deepest stages of sleep and our brain activity increases. It’s called the REM which stands for Rapid Eye Movement Phase. In this stage, our brain can mimic being awake. When we dream about faces, the facial recognition part of our brain turns on and when we look around in our dreams, our brain acts we are awake and looking around. “Dream Dictionary’s” might tell you your dreams have special meanings but even when that’s a cool idea, it’s not backed up by science. 

Is the same with nightmares? If you dream averagely, for 6 years over your life, is this to a certain age…what if you live longer or shorter?

I understand REM and how it works.

100WC – Week #46 -then suddenly it went dark

Aonani swayed the torch. Cari glared at her.

“Stop it!” she hissed. Aonani rolled her eyes.

“Nothings going to happen.” But it didn’t help that Cari was on edge. She wasn’t usually scared of the dark. She loved the dark actually. They were exploring a cave they had never seen before.  She also didn’t really like physical touching.Which was why the next thing that happened surprised me so much. Cari’s hand grabbed Aonani’s as the torch flickered.

Cari stumbled and Aonani grabbed her collar to stop her from falling.

Cari’s eyes went wide, “Aonani-” and then suddenly it went dark.

100WC – Week #44

The image is here!

My best friend, Perci had a sense of humour. That was something I loved about her… she laughed all the time.

My favourite memories of us was in art class. We could paint whatever we wanted. Perci painted a seal and it was hilarious. The seal was on its side with its flippers clutching its stomach. It looked like it was laughing! Perci was a really good painter, so it looked real. We were giggling so bad!

Perci died of cancer two years later.

She’s like family to me. I miss her.

I love Perci so much.

Someday I’ll see her.

BTN – Ocean Floor Mapping

I wrote a copy and I was messing around with the touchscreen keyboard and the tab deleted. I couldn’t remember everything I wrote so I had to work with what I remembered and add other stuff. It’s not as good as my first one. Just a heads up.

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Ocean Floor Mapping

 

This article was about the missing MH370 and “The Fish” and, of course, ocean floor mapping.

On March 2014 an airplane heading to China from Malaysia went missing just under 30 minutes after take-off. After three years of searching, the case had been officially closed in January. But 4.7 million square kilometres of ocean was mapped in the biggest and most expensive aircraft search in history. It didn’t find the MH370 but it gave scientist’s a chance to map the seafloor. Most of our maps of the sea aren’t very detailed. We actually have more detailed maps for planets like Mars instead of the Ocean. We use satellites to give rough estimates but that isn’t enough to find a lost plane. This is where the “Fish” comes in. The Fish is a machine that sends sound waves to the bottom of the sea. Then a signal comes back. The strength of the signal tells us how deep it is and whether the ground is hard or soft. The Fish has helped map 700 thousand square kilometres of ocean floor. The data could help research in climate change and it can help predict when tsunamis will hit. But the mapped area is only 1% of Indian Ocean. 

Are there different models of The Fish? What are some theories of how the MH370 went missing?

I understand how The Fish can help map the Ocean floor.

 

100WC – #43 – Cushion, Scarlet, Annoying, Watered, Violin

 

Scarlet looked over at Katie. The most annoying person ever. She was next to perform. She was waiting on a cushion with her violin. It was sparkly and bright purple. Ugh! Now, you’re probably wondering “Why is she so bad?”

Dad had finished watered the garden. We went out to the garden to play. I then heard a screech. I looked over to see Katie practising the violin. It went on for a while then she noticed me. She got in my face quick.

“Don’t you tell anyone about this or I will make your life hell.” She was nine.

BTN – Megafauna Fossil Footprints

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Click the link for the video!

This article was about evidence on extinct animals found on Kangaroo Island.

The scientific name of the Tasmanian Tiger is Thylacinus cynocephalus. Apparently it basically means pouched dog with a wolf’s head. It was called that because it looked like a pouched dog with a wolf’s head. The thylacine went extinct almost 100 years ago. Experts say it died out because of hunting, loss of habitat and disease. Over time the Tasmanian Tiger has become sort of an Aussie mystery, the only reason because is that there’ve been thousands of reported sightings out in the wild. But none of those have been proven so it is near impossible it could still be alive.

Are there any other extinct animals on Kangaroo Island? Do people try to find evidence that the Tasmanian Tiger is still alive?

I understand that without rock hard evidence then no one can prove anything extinct is still alive.

Principal Day – Rebecca

Rebecca is our Vice Principal. If you, Reader, are the Rebecca we are talking about…hey! If you are some random person that is called Rebecca…hey! If your name isn’t Rebecca…hey!

For those who don’t know who Rebecca is, here is some stuff about her.

Rebecca is the sweetest person I know, she cares about what we are learning, she is so caring. Rebecca is helpful and so beautiful. No…not beautiful…gorgeous! Once I was sad and I went over to have chat with Rebecca about my violin. I don’t know if she realised I was sad but she smiled at me and it made me happy and when I said bye, she gave me a hug. Rebecca, if you don’t remember this then that’s okay. You helped me then and many times before and after that. There are many more things I can say about this (this post is already 156 words) but for now…

Thank you Rebecca!